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Seattle Designer

6 posts in this topic

Hello all,

Can anyone recommend a good designer here in the Seattle area? I'm looking for someone to do bottle / package design.

Thanks,

Ross

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Hello all,

Can anyone recommend a good designer here in the Seattle area? I'm looking for someone to do bottle / package design.

Thanks,

Ross

Hi Ross,

Joe Farmer, owner of WhizBang Studio. He's done lots of wine labels, a few distilled spirit labels, and really knows the local printers. His email is: joef@whizbangstudio.com. Tell him I sent you!

Enjoy the process.

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Hi Ross,

Would like to throw my own firm's name into the hat.

And if we're not a good fit, I know a ton of great designers.

Would be happy to help you find the right one.

The TTB specs are straightforward, so there's really little advantage to going with a designer or firm who's done "a lot" of wine/spirit labels.

Go with someone (individual or firm) who's talented, whose style matches the personality you want to express, someone who understands the context/environment in which your product will be presented, and above all, someone who you'd trust to babysit your children when you're out of town.

No point in throwing heart, intellect, craft & soul into something and then half-ass its presentation.

Best,

Eric Sheckler

www.parts-and-labor.com

Hello all,

Can anyone recommend a good designer here in the Seattle area? I'm looking for someone to do bottle / package design.

Thanks,

Ross

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I know this is an old post, but I'm just seeing it and felt I had something to add.

I respectfully but strongly disagree with Eric. The written TTB specs themselves may appear straightforward (mandatory info, gov warning, type-size, etc.), but there are many unwritten specs that can be surprising and which can stall the process for months.

I know this from experience with my own labels (Who knew the words "refreshing aperitif" may not appear on a spirits label?), those I've designed for others, and from speaking with many of my distiller pals. The label approval specialists at the TTB have a certain amount of discretionary ability, and that means capricious and inconsistent decisions. Believe me, compliant labeling experience is a tremendous advantage for any designer, and their clients.

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